Home » The Life Cycle of Psychological Ideas: Understanding Prominence and the Dynamics of Intellectual Change by Thomas Carlyle Dalton
The Life Cycle of Psychological Ideas: Understanding Prominence and the Dynamics of Intellectual Change Thomas Carlyle Dalton

The Life Cycle of Psychological Ideas: Understanding Prominence and the Dynamics of Intellectual Change

Thomas Carlyle Dalton

Published December 31st 2003
ISBN : 9780306479984
Hardcover
364 pages
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 About the Book 

The idea for this book ?rst emerged from a symposium invited by - vision 1 of the American Psychological Association (APA) that was c- ceived by Lewis Lipsitt, who was president of the Division in 2000. The symposium,MoreThe idea for this book ?rst emerged from a symposium invited by - vision 1 of the American Psychological Association (APA) that was c- ceived by Lewis Lipsitt, who was president of the Division in 2000. The symposium, Re?ectionsintheMirrorofPsychology sPast, chairedby co-editor, Thomas Dalton was organized to pay tribute to John Popp- stone and Marion McPherson, who founded the Archives of the History of American Psychology at the University of Akron, Ohio in 1965. The panel included John Popplestone, my co-editor, Rand Evans and Robert Wozniak, who have contributed chapters to this book. John and Marion, who both served as past presidents of Division 26 of the History of P- chology, retired in 1999 and turned the leadership of the collection over to its new director, David Baker. They were honored at that time by the APAwithaPresidentialCitationfortheirachievementsandweregivena FestschriftinApril2000hostedbytheAkronarchivesattendedbyseveral distinguishedpsychologiststhatincludedLewisLipsitt, LudyT. Benjamin andJohnBurnham. Anhonoraryfundalsowasestablishedintheirnames for individual donations. Sadly, Marion passed away shortly afterward, butherspiritanddeterminationliveonattheAkronarchives. JohnandMarion stirelesseffortstomakethisatrulygreatrepository areindicatedbythesheersizeofthecollection. Thearchivenowpossesses thepapersofmorethan700psychologistsandtherecordsofmorethan100 psychology journals. It has stored 700 kinds of psychological apparatus and testing instruments, 3000 rare photos and nearly 153 miles of child development?lms, examplesofwhicharewonderfullydisplayedintheir popularbook, AnIllustratedHistoryofAmericanPsychology. LudyBenjamin, who spent countless productive hours researching the Akron archives, vii viii PREFACE perhapsbestdescribedJohnandMarion spioneeringcontribution, when hewrote: So one can argue that the time was right for someone to have the historicalconsciousnesstorecognizetheneedforacentralarchivefor psychology. I want to emphasize the word vision. . . Vision is a rare commodity. Inthiscontextitmeanstoseethingsinwaysthatnoone elsedoes. Itmeanstobeabletoseeinlongstretches, tolookbeyond your own time and see needs that no one else may anticipate.